Primary Health Care


Primary health care (PHC) refers to “essential health care” that is based on scientifically sound and socially acceptable methods and technology, which make universal health care universally accessible to individuals and families in a community. It is through their full participation and at a cost that the community and the country can afford to maintain at every stage of their development in the spirit of self-reliance and self-determination”.

In other words, PHC is an approach to health beyond the traditional health care system that focuses on health equity-producing social policy. PHC includes all areas that play a role in health, such as access to health services, environment and lifestyle. Thus, primary health care and public health measures, taken together, may be considered as the cornerstones of universal health systems.

The ultimate goal of primary health care is the attainment of better health services for all. It is for this reason that World Health Organization (WHO), has identified five key elements to achieving this goal:

  • reducing exclusion and social disparities in health (universal coverage reforms);
  • organizing health services around people’s needs and expectations (service delivery reforms);
  • integrating health into all sectors (public policy reforms);
  • pursuing collaborative models of policy dialogue (leadership reforms); and
  • increasing stakeholder participation.

Behind these elements lies a series of basic principles identified in the Alma Ata Declaration that should be formulated in national policies in order to launch and sustain PHC as part of a comprehensive health system and in coordination with other sectors:

Equitable distribution of health care – according to this principle, primary care and other services to meet the main health problems in a community must be provided equally to all individuals irrespective of their gender, age, caste, color, urban/rural location and social class.

Community participation – in order to make the fullest use of local, national and other available resources. Community participation was considered sustainable due to its grass roots nature and emphasis on self-sufficiency, as opposed to targeted (or vertical) approaches dependent on international development assistance.

Health workforce development – comprehensive health care relies on adequate number and distribution of trained physicians, nurses, allied health professions, community health workers and others working as a health team and supported at the local and referral levels.

Use of appropriate technology – medical technology should be provided that is accessible, affordable, feasible and culturally acceptable to the community. Examples of appropriate technology include refrigerators for vaccine cold storage. Less appropriate could include, in many settings, body scanners or heart-lung machines, which benefit only a small minority concentrated in urban areas. They are generally not accessible to the poor, but draw a large share of resources.

Multi-sectional approach – recognition that health cannot be improved by intervention within just the formal health sector; other sectors are equally important in promoting the health and self-reliance of communities. These sectors include, at least: agriculture (e.g. food security); education; communication (e.g. concerning prevailing health problems and the methods of preventing and controlling them); housing; public works (e.g. ensuring an adequate supply of safe water and basic sanitation); rural development; industry; community organizations (including Panchayats or local governments, voluntary organizations, etc.).

In sum, PHC recognizes that health care is not a short-lived intervention, but an ongoing process of improving people’s lives and alleviating the underlying socioeconomic conditions that contribute to poor health. The principles link health and development, advocating political interventions, rather than passive acceptance of economic conditions.


INTERESTING FACT
THE “BAREFOOT DOCTORS” OF CHINA WERE AN IMPORTANT INSPIRATION FOR PHC BECAUSE THEY ILLUSTRATED THE EFFECTIVENESS OF HAVING A HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONAL AT THE COMMUNITY LEVEL WITH COMMUNITY TIES. BAREFOOT DOCTORS WERE A DIVERSE ARRAY OF VILLAGE HEALTH WORKERS WHO LIVED IN RURAL AREAS AND RECEIVED BASIC HEALTH CARE TRAINING. THEY STRESSED RURAL RATHER THAN URBAN HEALTH CARE, AND PREVENTIVE RATHER THAN CURATIVE SERVICES....Read More