Cardiothoracic Surgery


Cardiothoracic surgery is the field of medicine involved in surgical treatment of organs inside the thoracic cavity generally treatment of conditions of the heart (heart disease), lungs (lung disease), and other pleural or mediastinal structures.

A cardiac surgery residency typically comprises anywhere from 4 to 6 years (or longer) of training to become a fully qualified surgeon.[2] Cardiac surgery training may be combined with thoracic surgery and / or vascular surgery and called cardiovascular (CV) / cardiothoracic (CT) / cardiovascular thoracic (CVT) surgery. Cardiac surgeons may enter a cardiac surgery residency directly from medical school, or first complete a general surgery residency followed by a fellowship. Cardiac surgeons may further sub-specialize cardiac surgery by doing a fellowship in a variety of topics including: pediatric cardiac surgery, cardiac transplantation, adult acquired heart disease, weak heart issues, and many more problems in the heart.

 One of the more commonly known cardiac surgery procedures is the coronary artery bypass graft (CABG), also known as "bypass surgery." In this procedure, vessels from elsewhere in the patient's body are harvested, and grafted to the coronary arteries to bypass blockages and improve the blood supply to the heart muscle.

Open heart surgery is a procedure in which the patient's heart is opened and surgery is performed on the internal structures of the heart. A major concern with cardiac surgery is the incidence of neurological damage. Stroke occurs in 5% of all people undergoing cardiac surgery, and is higher in patients at risk for stroke. A more subtle constellation of neurocognitive deficits attributed to cardiopulmonary bypass is known as postperfusion syndrome, sometimes called "pumphead". The symptoms of postperfusion syndrome were initially felt to be permanent, but were shown to be transient with no permanent neurological impairment.

INTERESTING FACT
THE FIRST SUCCESSFUL SURGERY OF THE HEART PERFORMED WITHOUT ANY COMPLICATIONS, WAS BY LUDWIG REHN OF FRANKFURT, GERMANY, WHO REPAIRED A STAB WOUND TO THE RIGHT VENTRICLE ON SEPTEMBER 7, 1896....Read More